Llarrinda Bed & Breakfast

Affordable Luxury Accommodation near Wilsons Prom

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Larry and I are privileged to live in one of the most beautiful parts of Australia and are delighted to share with you glimpses of life in this wonderful corner of the world.

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A special encounter with history

Posted on 13 October, 2017 at 6:45 Comments comments (0)



Some things are just meant to be.


Larry and I arrived in Australia in 1983 and two weeks later I found a wonderful job with a company that no longer exists: Elders IXL.  Elders was a complex organisation, comprising a multitude of companies in a variety of industries which had amalgamated over many years.  One such company was Goldsbrough Mort & Co., a wool broking and auctioneering company founded in 1888, later to be known as Elder Smith Goldsbrough Mort.  


In 1981 Elder Smith Goldsbrough Mort & Co Ltd became part of the Elders IXL group of companies, which I had just joined.


In the first few months of my time at Elders, their offices in the old Jam Facrtory in South Yarra underwent a massive renovation to absorb the head offices of all of the recently acquired businesses. Walls were demolished, plush modern spaces created and many records of the old, pre-merger businesses were piled in the corner to be taken to the tip. 


Now, I'm from England and have a certain regard for history.  So, hating to see old records destroyed, I 'rescued' a few pieces from the debris, including a leather-bound book of hand-written Goldsbrough Mort minutes dating from 1916 to 1967.


That Minute Book has sat proudly on our book shelves or 34 years, initially in Melbourne, and more recently in Foster.  I suspect that no one other than me has ever looked at it.  Until now. 


In July this year guests from Melbourne checked in to Llarrinda Bed & Breakfast for two nights.  The reason they chose to stay with us was not because of our comfortable accommodation, wonderful views and abundant wilflife, but because our name, Llarrinda is so similar to our guest's name, Laurinda.  The first of several coincidences. 


They could have chosen to stay in any of our three guest bedrooms, but chose to stay in our 'Panorama Suite'.


Laurinda's husband, Ross, was immediately drawn to a picture on their bedroom wall containing the front and back covers of the June 1906 edition of Goldsorough Mort & Co's 'Australian Pastoralist's Review,' which I had also salvaged from the skip and had framed.   It gave him a shiver, as his grandfather had worked for Goldsbrough Mort and Co for 49 years, and had served as Company Secretary from 1928 to 1945.


Then Ross spotted the leather-bound Minute book and opened it.  And there he saw the hand writing of his grandfather.  It was a goosebump moment for him and for me, when he told me about it the next morning.


Ross told me about his Dad, now well into his 90's, and how much he would love to see that book.  Of course, it was never mine to keep, and I am so very thankful that what would have been destroyed forever has now found its rightful home, with Ross' father - the son of the man who wrote the minutes.


It's a small world out there, and it's very special when one coincidence leads so happily to another.  Enjoy that salvaged treasure, Mr Eddington, and we hope that one day we will to able to welcome you, too, to Llarrinda.




Whales are on the move!

Posted on 13 September, 2017 at 1:10 Comments comments (0)

The tail of a spectacular Humpback Whale.


Each year between April and November, Australia's eastern coastline comes alive with Humpback Whales and the more rare Southern Right Whales, as they travel on their migration routes from and to Antarctica.  Now that Spring is here, they are heading back to their icy feeding grounds in the Southern Ocean, having spent winter in warmer waters, mating and giving birth.


Humpback whales migrate a mind-blowing 5,000 km on average, one of the longest migratory journeys of any mammal on earth!  They are known to go north to the tropical waters off Far North Queensland, whereas the Southern Right Whales head to the much cooler waters off the south coast of Australia, including Wilsons Prom, one of the most beautiful and remote areas in the world.


Without doubt, Humpbacks are the stars of whale migration, with their spectacular leaps into the air creating never-to-forget photo opportunities for those fortunate to see it.


Southern Right Whale females have their first calf at 6 or 7 years of age, and they then have one calf every three years. They are slow breeders, which is why their numbers have not recovered well from the whaling days of last century.  Female Southern Right Whales usually come back to the same coastal waters to raise each calf, often where they themselves were born.  


Visitors to this corner of Victoria will have an ideal opportunity to view these magestic creature during October and November, when Wildlife Coast Cruises will conduct whale watching cruises around Wilsons Prom.   Additional cruises are scheduled during December, February, March and April.  Larry and I are fortunate to have been on several Wildlife Coast Cruises, and this Bed and Breakfast near Wilsons Prom can't recommend them highly enough.


For enquiries and bookings visit www.wildlifecoastcruises.com.au or call 1300 763 739.




Spring is definitely in the air!

Posted on 8 September, 2017 at 22:55 Comments comments (0)

How lucky are we!  

Guests often say that looking out of the windows at Llarrinda is better than watching TV.   And we couldn't agree more because, with every minute of every day, our panoramic view changes.  Being high on a ridge overlooking farmland, to the waters of Corner Inlet and the northern mountains of Wilsons Prom National Park beyond, we can see the weather come and go and have a bird's eye view of all the passing wildlife.  None pleases us more than the multitude of birds that come to feed on our deck.


We never saw Little Corella's here in the early days - they were always flying in large and noisy flocks over the low lands looking for food.  Little Corellas usually feed on the ground, but occasionally in trees and shrubs. They eat a variety of wild and cultivated seeds and regularly feed on lawn grasses in urban areas, and on crops such as wheat, barley and corn, so it's no wonder that many people struggle to love them.


A few years ago a lone couple of Little Corellas discovered our bird feeders and came back every winter and stayed for a few months.  Then there were two couples, and now three couples - six Little Corellas in all - which are reliably here on our deck almost every day for breakfast, lunch or dinner, feeding on the wild bird seed mix we put in our feeders.


This year though has brought something special.  They have chosen Llarrinda Bed & Breakfast as a place to mate, nest, and raise next season's young. 


We admit to feeling slightly awkward about watching and photographing this tender and loving act but at the same time are enthralled to be able to witness nature at such close range.  


We have read that Little Corellas can live up to 80 years (although I suspect that's in captivity), and that they mate for life.  You can see in the way they relate to each other that there is genuine affection.  We love their cheeky personalities, the way they waddle and the way they show off by hanging upside-down with their feet or beaks.  And, if you listen closely you can hear them having deep and meaningful conversations, using an impressive range of vocabulary.

 

They are not blessed with the most melodic voices, but they make up for it in sheer personality and incredible beauty.  This Bed & Breakfast accommodation near Wilsons Prom is truly a nature lover's paradise.



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